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Braking- A different way to think about it

OIC

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Braking on the track, specifically late trail braking has long been my biggest weak spot. I always ended up braking too long and slowing too much. I thought this was pretty well written and had me thinking about working the tire and suspension smoothly to get maximum (for me) braking. Using the initial brake input to get the suspension set and in the sweet spot of stroke, tire contact patch spread out and then squeeze on the lever.

 
Ha it keeps the chain tight and eliminates driveline lash. Best practiced on a scooter in the neighborhood. Where the speed limit of 25-35mph can be used turn after turn. But also the easiest way to loose a tailgater on any bike going into a corner. But even on a straight away applying the rear brake with the throttle eliminates drive line lash. I tend to ride with a locked throttle hand the older I get. And revert back to the Kieth Code videos on how to open the throttle when the time is right. Also no velocity drops in the intake charge of the motor playing throttle games for a minor speed change. Upsetting the chassis never works. And driveline lash and a velocity drop equalling poor mixing will do it every time. Also hammering the front brake can change rake trail to throw the bike on an edge then to follow with a wide open after the apex. Comes very natural riding a super moto, a scooter and a sportbike in the same day.
 
Ha it keeps the chain tight and eliminates driveline lash. Best practiced on a scooter in the neighborhood. Where the speed limit of 25-35mph can be used turn after turn. But also the easiest way to loose a tailgater on any bike going into a corner. But even on a straight away applying the rear brake with the throttle eliminates drive line lash. I tend to ride with a locked throttle hand the older I get. And revert back to the Kieth Code videos on how to open the throttle when the time is right. Also no velocity drops in the intake charge of the motor playing throttle games for a minor speed change. Upsetting the chassis never works. And driveline lash and a velocity drop equalling poor mixing will do it every time. Also hammering the front brake can change rake trail to throw the bike on an edge then to follow with a wide open after the apex. Comes very natural riding a super moto, a scooter and a sportbike in the same day.


No don't run the chain tight all that is going to do is stretch the chain, and make your rear suspension not work.

If drive line lash lash is an issue, drag a little rear brake OR get better with blipping your down shifts and it should be an issue done smoothly.

Braking on the track, specifically late trail braking has long been my biggest weak spot. I always ended up braking too long and slowing too much. I thought this was pretty well written and had me thinking about working the tire and suspension smoothly to get maximum (for me) braking. Using the initial brake input to get the suspension set and in the sweet spot of stroke, tire contact patch spread out and then squeeze on the lever.


You have a track handy? Because the easiest way to learn trailing is to start from ludicrous speed and walk your brake point in toward the corner, ideally a corner that are aren't going to "bell".
 
Hehe the chain stays tight from trailing throttle with trailing brake. Hence no lash and no lapse of power. Learned all this riding in the snow and ice commuting to work for 10 winters.. before that lived in Florida with a sumo and used downshifts to break the back out but the smooth transition around the apex was learned from riding on ice. On throttle trailing rear brake is a cheat. Use it on a pullstart back yard racer to a sportbikes. And can usually keep a gear higher because the engine is loaded with no velocity drops in the intake charge.
 
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Interesting read.

Using the front brake to settle the chassis down before going in to a corner can be very effective. Especially if you're on a dual sport or something that you don't want stiff sporty suspension tailored for turning fast.

Most of my early bikes handled pretty loose (aka: flat out bad) and settling the bike in to a corner with the front brake became second nature. Years later I spent a lot of money on suspension to set up a bike just how I wanted it. Man, being able to hammer down and accelerate through a corner because your bike doesn't need you to brake the nose down is a helluva feeling.

I still give the front brake a squeeze most the time. Old habits and all that 😁
 
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I use the front to decrease rake which allows me to throw the bike on an edge faster. Then everything is set in motion before the apex. By the apex I release the rear brake and roll on the throttle in a linear fashion. So much easier to learn on slow bikes when every one complains you dont speed but you dont slow down. Faster apex speeds is the result. Lately I've found a harsh counter steer helps in dirt flattrack to get the bike pitched quicker and harder to the point I can hammer the throttle. Works brakeless too
 
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Driveline lash? Did someone mention shaft drive?
Dualsports run a little bit of extra chain slack added to internal slop on the primary gear and transmission gears. Thats why I find it so useful to have the brake and the throttle on at the same time before the apex. And in dirt or mud it is easier to hold steady throttle and control wheel slip with the rear brake. But as EGR post states throttle is applied before the apex which coincidentally might still be in the time frame of trailing the rear brake. All the other factors line up such as no lash and no intake velocity drops to deal with mid apex. Like a loaded slingshot ready to be released.
 
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Maybe a bit oversimplified but I heard something a while back along the lines of if you think of the brakes as tools the front would be a hammer and the rear would be a scalpel.
 
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