What's new

Camping light

Yinzer Moto

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 25, 2022
Member Number
4
Posts
2,781
Location
Pittsburgh
What are some of your tips and tricks for keeping your luggage light?


My pack weight has gone through a lot of changes and it is really amazing what a few pounds difference can do to the handling of the bike.

My first trip camping off the bike was on the TAT. My gear was extremely bulky.

63826343-6DC5-4574-AB3F-03116A36AC09.jpeg


In the years since, I keep finding new gear that packs smaller and has multi uses. This is what my gear looks like for a long weekend of camping.

B4CA0C9A-6355-42F3-B526-8223B5EB1B01.jpeg

FE97EF24-D32C-4CD3-A09B-486C9D5DA3EE.jpeg
 
D0EFCA8C-69B3-49AC-A557-3B6866D59F59.jpeg


This is a pic of my camp (on the right). It is a REI bivy sack (this bivy is mesh, I have since switched to a waterproof one) with a tarp over top for a sheltered space. The air mattress is an insulated big angus. The sleeping bag is a down REI. The pillow is an inflatable sea to summit. I don’t always take the camp chair in the photo, it is bulky.
 
DSC00015.JPG


DSC00179.JPG


Mostly the same stuff, the Honda is better mannered if there is more highway miles involved.
I don't bring any cooking gear, usually ride an hour or so to a breakfast spot. Mid-afternoon I pick up a sandwich for that night. Rarely have a fire. Carry boxed wine w/o the box, don't need ice or a cooler. Put it in a creek if one is handy. Stealth camp a bit, I feel the more it costs for a campground the worse it is. Height of luxury is having a picnic table.
 
Another great revelation was the compression bag.



9C8F6EF2-AD90-4E9B-A7B5-4FB71382A6AA.jpeg


You can never have too many of these. I have some of these lesser expensive ones and a few Sea To Summit bags. These allow gear to be compressed to extremely small sizes. They will squish all the air out of a sleeping bag or pile of clothes.

Additionally, I never pack anything that is cotton, all synthetic materials or wool. I frequently see people packing denim jeans, they are extremely heavy and do not pack down well.

My footwear outside of Moto boots are sandals. They are also extremely light and can be strapped to the outside of the luggage. Some people like to hike while on a Moto trip, I don’t do much more than a scenic walk, so I don’t need hiking boots.
 
As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.
A little weight can make a huge difference, especially when placed far from the centers of gravity.

In this photo below, you can see a RotoPax hiding on top of my rear rack. We all had them, in the same spot for this trip. We filled them on the first day of the trip and did not empty them till the last couple days of the trip, when we were getting closer to civilization.

On the day we dumped the gas in the tanks, just before lunch, we rode 20 miles down a nicely maintained dirt road, with really great sweeping corners. We had lunch and looked at maps. We decided that going that direction was a mistake and decided to take that road the 20 miles back and go a different way. Also at lunch, we decided to dump the gas from the RotoPax into the tanks, because we were heading back more populated areas. The difference in bike handling was night and day. I could confidently drift the bike through entire corners without that gallon of fuel at the top/back of the rear fender. I have never used that RotoPax on that bike before, I also remember coming out of corner, I would really have to crawl forward on the bike, to keep the front wheel on the ground. That extra weight really slowed down the pace that I was used to traveling at. It would have been so much better to have a fuel tank that is 1 gallon larger and have the fuel closer to the center of the bike.

B5A360CB-FD1D-47F4-9D98-987C33AA3B60.jpeg
 
The reason I chose a Mosko Moto R80 system over an R40 was the ability to keep everything as low as possible. I don't need 80L of capacity.

If MM would lighten up their gear, that'd be even better. It's very well made and durable, but I think they could shave pounds off of the R80 without degrading it.
The BYOB(bring your own bag) ideology of the Green Chile Straps allows me to go lighter with the bags if I wanted. These are cheap Amazon bags that are heavy but if I destroy them in an off I'm not out much money. Plus I can grab anything off the shelf at a big box or outdoor store and have a new bag.
 
The reason I chose a Mosko Moto R80 system over an R40 was the ability to keep everything as low as possible. I don't need 80L of capacity.

If MM would lighten up their gear, that'd be even better. It's very well made and durable, but I think they could shave pounds off of the R80 without degrading it.
Their stuff is just waaaay too clunky/overbuilt for my taste.
 
Another great revelation was the compression bag.



9C8F6EF2-AD90-4E9B-A7B5-4FB71382A6AA.jpeg


You can never have too many of these. I have some of these lesser expensive ones and a few Sea To Summit bags. These allow gear to be compressed to extremely small sizes. They will squish all the air out of a sleeping bag or pile of clothes.

Additionally, I never pack anything that is cotton, all synthetic materials or wool. I frequently see people packing denim jeans, they are extremely heavy and do not pack down well.

My footwear outside of Moto boots are sandals. They are also extremely light and can be strapped to the outside of the luggage. Some people like to hike while on a Moto trip, I don’t do much more than a scenic walk, so I don’t need hiking boots.
I never knew what those were for... thanks!

My sleeping bag came in a compression style pouch and I've always remarked at how compact it can get.
 
As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.
Their stuff is just waaaay too clunky/overbuilt for my taste.
I have both an R80 (for the 701) and an R40 for the 500, I have to say their stuff is very durable, but damn, that R80 is heavy.

I've kind of been thinking/dreaming about the Wolfman E or B base stuff. I like the modular idea. I think you could build it to carry different loads better switching between bikes and types of trips. Does anyone have experience with both the Mosko and Wolfman E or B base luggage that can compare?
 
Can old guys that have had 6 knee surgeries and broken their backs talk about chairs in this thread or is this the "I cut the handle off my toothbrush to save 4 grams" thread?

Real weight weenies just put the tooth paste on their finger to brush their teeth.

I think there is a chair thread somewhere around here too.
 
I have both an R80 (for the 701) and an R40 for the 500, I have to say their stuff is very durable, but damn, that R80 is heavy.

I've kind of been thinking/dreaming about the Wolfman E or B base stuff. I like the modular idea. I think you could build it to carry different loads better switching between bikes and types of trips. Does anyone have experience with both the Mosko and Wolfman E or B base luggage that can compare?
I tried a B Base on my 890. It's a great system. Wolfman was literally a decade ahead of anyone else with this stuff. In the end, I hate how stiff his bags are, and I really missed outer pockets to stuff things for quick access. I switched to a GL Siskiyou on the big bike.

One option might be the Altrider Hemisphere. I use that on my 690. It's the best of the horseshoe bags, IMHO. A real sleeper in the market.
 
Pairing your kit down to just the two main bags saves some weight with the MM systems, and keeps it low.
It seems to me that it is the main harness part, at least on the V2 R80 I have, to be the heaviest part. I have to say though, I have used and abused mine for tens of thousands of miles and it holds up.

For smaller luggage, I had the original Coyote (avatar pic) and did not like the one big bag idea. The R40 is about the right size for me with what I like to pack with a larger 22 liter top bag. No way I could get away with just the side bags. My gear is all UL backpacking gear, but I like to be comfortable.
 
Back
Top Bottom