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Chinese made bikes

RowBust

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Joined
Feb 8, 2022
Member Number
302
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71
Location
Australia
Really happy with mine
IMG_20220220_151105872.jpg
 

MrWellAdjusted

One Less Car
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101
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156
Location
Canada
Well I think if you took the world market they probably are already? Take China for starters, add in all the Pacific Rim countries and you're there on that alone. India, I would imagine is 2nd.
I imagine, there are a lot of small displacement Chinese bikes being sold in developing Africa, the Middle East and South America. Companies like Zongshen, Quanjiang will be just fine without the American market.
 

Shinyribs

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Mar 12, 2022
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849
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252
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VA
Yes, the 790 , CF Moto make most of the KTMs, they own most of the company. Fantastic bike, top quality
If you're trying to say CFMoto own most of KTM, no. That's not true.

CFMoto owns 51% of the CFMoto/KTM R2R joint venture, but KTM is not owned by them.

And, fuck China and their absolutely disgusting way they treat humans. I won't be selling my soul to save a dollar on a cheap bike.
 

TexasAggie

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Mar 24, 2022
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955
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34
Location
Dallas
I went to China in 2004 for work. Spent 14 years there. While their government is not good in MANY ways, I think it is hypocritical to condemn them and not look at the clown show we have in Washington DC with the same glasses on. This goes double for the Chinese media propaganda there versus our supposed honest media here in the USA. (My zero tolerance for hypocrisy on any side of the political spectrum is a curse.) I found the Chinese people to be like Americans in many ways. Most folks were great but of course there were dishonest fuckers. What I can say is I personally have been screwed over by fellow Americans and some folks in the EU than I ever was cheated by partners in China. That is not to say there are no bad players, I just have noted there seems to be the same percentage of bad players in a given amount of population everywhere. It is why I like dogs....Anyway, it was always fun for me to get on on a motorcycle and just take off into the countryside for a day or three. My first Chinese bike was a 2006 Chang Jiang sidecar. 1937 technology down to the wax paper covered spark plug wires. Still used Ignition Points and Condenser! Totally unreliable and totally a blast to ride. Second Chinese bike was the venerable Jialing 600. Had Bosch ignition and much better quality but still had lots of little issue to fix. Ended up with a BMW 800GS. By far the best quality but I definitely paid for it up front. Looking back, the Chang Jiang cost me less than $2000 new in 2006 and gave me the best memories. All this being said, the quality of bike in China are definitely improving. I laughed at the Japanese Suzuki 400 frames breaking while I was racing my Bultaco El Bandito in early 1970's. 15 years later, Bultaco and Maico were dead and the Japanese were kicking ass. I will not laugh at up and coming again.....
 

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RowBust

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Location
Australia
If you're trying to say CFMoto own most of KTM, no. That's not true.

CFMoto owns 51% of the CFMoto/KTM R2R joint venture, but KTM is not owned by them.

And, fuck China and their absolutely disgusting way they treat humans. I won't be selling my soul to save a dollar on a cheap bike.
Yes you are correct about the ownership
The USA has a poor record on human rights as does Australia
 

Amos Malone

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How long before Chinese made bikes become best selling bikes in the world?
I think you mean Chinese brands because large portions of nearly every bike come from China. Not mentioning the 200 000 bikes Honda exports from China per year to sell under own brand.
 
Last edited:

kickstandsup

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Tell that to the American companies that manufacture in China

I do with my voice, political votes and purchase decisions. It would appear that global manufacturers are starting to rethink their investments as well, as are individual purchasers throughout democracies.
 

Shinyribs

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VA
Yes you are correct about the ownership
The USA has a poor record on human rights as does Australia
Not arguing, just a current events fact. Not historical fact, current events.

Did you know that Chinese border guards give people fleeing North Korea choices? You can be sold in to slavery in China ( virgins are worth more, you can figure it out the form of slavery from there), or you can go back to North Korea.

When you're drug back to North Korea, Chinese border guards have taken to looping wires around your collarbone to tie you to the parade of other folk they're leading back to public execution. Your not worth expensive handcuffs. That's not something out of a dystopian horror movie at all, right?

But yeah, my local congressman isn't on my Christmas card list, either.
 

matty

Border raider.
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England Scotish border
I understand the above remarks on Bikes/ components made in china as opposed to Chinese brand bikes.
In that case the latter (Chinese brand bikes) could be some years probably ten + years before the Chinese brands could be turning out some bikes which could realistically match the established Japanese and western manufacturers offerings.
I admit the Chinese have stepped up their design and quality control over the past 15 or so years, and the likes of lifan & zongchen etc are making serviceable clone engines and and they get the job done it has to be said.
but once you start looking at the whole packages they turn out, they really do have a long way to go.
I consider they undoubtedly can produce quality products like suspension and good trim and cycle parts, but once they do this even with their low labor costs , the typically cheap Chinese price bumps up considerably as the quality approaces that of the competition.
and at that point the practicality of Chinese production starts to look less of a bargain.
If you look at the WK bikes ER6 clone, and the power the WK team could get out of the engine used by garry johnson in the Lightweight IOM TT a few years ago compared to the genuine Kawasaki and kawasaki powered competition, that showed only too well what the shortfalls still very much are with the Chinese bikes, basically what looks the same is not necessarily the same.
The castings on many Chinese bikes and other things too, are often of poor quality, you only need try and repair a cracked casing compared to an ancient BSA casing, and welding the Chinese case is akin to welding an alloy sponge it must be said.
We could talk electrics the wiring connectors the windings and the quality of the wire itself incorporated in the chinese looms even today, and they are just not there yet.
I dare say that dependant on what a person puts a bike through might make or break and bike of any manufacture not just a chinese bike, But i can tell you from personal experience, use a Lifan daily and hard in all weathers, parking it in the rain and expecting the thing to keep working, as you would absolutely expect and receive from say a Honda CG125 for the sake of discussion here, the Lifan will give you grief, the water ingress into the loom connectors and piss poor bulb holders, that simply are not made of corosive resistant enough materials of sufficient quality to maintain an effective conection to do the simple task of lighting a bulb. No, IMO based on my experiences they have a way to go to cut it in the real world with their out of the box offerings .
 

RowBust

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 8, 2022
Member Number
302
Posts
71
Location
Australia
I understand the above remarks on Bikes/ components made in china as opposed to Chinese brand bikes.
In that case the latter (Chinese brand bikes) could be some years probably ten + years before the Chinese brands could be turning out some bikes which could realistically match the established Japanese and western manufacturers offerings.
I admit the Chinese have stepped up their design and quality control over the past 15 or so years, and the likes of lifan & zongchen etc are making serviceable clone engines and and they get the job done it has to be said.
but once you start looking at the whole packages they turn out, they really do have a long way to go.
I consider they undoubtedly can produce quality products like suspension and good trim and cycle parts, but once they do this even with their low labor costs , the typically cheap Chinese price bumps up considerably as the quality approaces that of the competition.
and at that point the practicality of Chinese production starts to look less of a bargain.
If you look at the WK bikes ER6 clone, and the power the WK team could get out of the engine used by garry johnson in the Lightweight IOM TT a few years ago compared to the genuine Kawasaki and kawasaki powered competition, that showed only too well what the shortfalls still very much are with the Chinese bikes, basically what looks the same is not necessarily the same.
The castings on many Chinese bikes and other things too, are often of poor quality, you only need try and repair a cracked casing compared to an ancient BSA casing, and welding the Chinese case is akin to welding an alloy sponge it must be said.
We could talk electrics the wiring connectors the windings and the quality of the wire itself incorporated in the chinese looms even today, and they are just not there yet.
I dare say that dependant on what a person puts a bike through might make or break and bike of any manufacture not just a chinese bike, But i can tell you from personal experience, use a Lifan daily and hard in all weathers, parking it in the rain and expecting the thing to keep working, as you would absolutely expect and receive from say a Honda CG125 for the sake of discussion here, the Lifan will give you grief, the water ingress into the loom connectors and piss poor bulb holders, that simply are not made of corosive resistant enough materials of sufficient quality to maintain an effective conection to do the simple task of lighting a bulb. No, IMO based on my experiences they have a way to go to cut it in the real world with their out of the box offerings .
We're not talking cheap pit bikes, many companies are using parts manufactured in China, my bike uses a 790 KTM engine made in China, the rest of the bike is also made in China and is top quality
 

TexasAggie

Active member
Joined
Mar 24, 2022
Member Number
955
Posts
34
Location
Dallas
Not arguing, just a current events fact. Not historical fact, current events.

Did you know that Chinese border guards give people fleeing North Korea choices? You can be sold in to slavery in China ( virgins are worth more, you can figure it out the form of slavery from there), or you can go back to North Korea.

When you're drug back to North Korea, Chinese border guards have taken to looping wires around your collarbone to tie you to the parade of other folk they're leading back to public execution. Your not worth expensive handcuffs. That's not something out of a dystopian horror movie at all, right?

But yeah, my local congressman isn't on my Christmas card list, either.
Have you been to China and verified this yourself? I lived there for 14 years and while I saw a lot I did not like or approve of, I also saw a lot that I liked. I am proud to be a Texan born and raised but also see things here in the USA that can be improved upon . I was always treated very well in China. I and many foreign friends often rode our motorcycles thru the countryside with freedom to go wherever we wanted. I often rode alone and had fantastic rides. I spent time in Dalian, which is very close to North Korea. I never tried to go to North Korea and I too heard there were corrupt guards involved in slave trafficking. However, we just had a 14 year old girl here in Dallas lured into prostitution and taken by a gang while attending a Dallas Mavericks basketball game. They found her in Oklahoma a week later but she is certainly never going to be the same and that was just an example of one instance of trafficking that goes on in the USA. Terrible evil exists everywhere but does not mean all the people where it happens are evil. My point is that using a broad brush to condemn an entire population of a country is rarely without an agenda and hypocrisy if your source of opinion is the media. I no longer trust anything given to me by mainstream media without critical challenge. This applies to both ends of the political spectrum. As it stands, I can easily respect differing opinions from others as long as it is not hypocritical. My zero tolerance for hypocrisy is a curse these days but I am too old and really do not want to change. Anyway, sorry for the hijack, just wanted to try and give a differing viewpoint on China since I actually lived there for so long. YMMV
 

TexasAggie

Active member
Joined
Mar 24, 2022
Member Number
955
Posts
34
Location
Dallas
I understand the above remarks on Bikes/ components made in china as opposed to Chinese brand bikes.
In that case the latter (Chinese brand bikes) could be some years probably ten + years before the Chinese brands could be turning out some bikes which could realistically match the established Japanese and western manufacturers offerings.
I admit the Chinese have stepped up their design and quality control over the past 15 or so years, and the likes of lifan & zongchen etc are making serviceable clone engines and and they get the job done it has to be said.
but once you start looking at the whole packages they turn out, they really do have a long way to go.
I consider they undoubtedly can produce quality products like suspension and good trim and cycle parts, but once they do this even with their low labor costs , the typically cheap Chinese price bumps up considerably as the quality approaces that of the competition.
and at that point the practicality of Chinese production starts to look less of a bargain.
If you look at the WK bikes ER6 clone, and the power the WK team could get out of the engine used by garry johnson in the Lightweight IOM TT a few years ago compared to the genuine Kawasaki and kawasaki powered competition, that showed only too well what the shortfalls still very much are with the Chinese bikes, basically what looks the same is not necessarily the same.
The castings on many Chinese bikes and other things too, are often of poor quality, you only need try and repair a cracked casing compared to an ancient BSA casing, and welding the Chinese case is akin to welding an alloy sponge it must be said.
We could talk electrics the wiring connectors the windings and the quality of the wire itself incorporated in the chinese looms even today, and they are just not there yet.
I dare say that dependant on what a person puts a bike through might make or break and bike of any manufacture not just a chinese bike, But i can tell you from personal experience, use a Lifan daily and hard in all weathers, parking it in the rain and expecting the thing to keep working, as you would absolutely expect and receive from say a Honda CG125 for the sake of discussion here, the Lifan will give you grief, the water ingress into the loom connectors and piss poor bulb holders, that simply are not made of corosive resistant enough materials of sufficient quality to maintain an effective conection to do the simple task of lighting a bulb. No, IMO based on my experiences they have a way to go to cut it in the real world with their out of the box offerings .
Having owned and rode a Chang Jiang and a Jialing for thousands of km, I can understand your post and appreciate why you feel the way you do about your Lifan experience. I at least had local access to parts that could be procured quickly and cheaply to keep things running. If you had a Lifan in Scotland with no access to getting parts directly from China, I can imagine the frustrations were huge. I tip my hat to you for your willingness to go out on the edge.........
 

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