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Royal Enfield Himalayan

RidewithWarro is certainly a character. Check out the video on the vehicles he's owned over the years, would be good to have a few beers with him! Check out all of his videos actually, he's ran in 20 odd royal enfields and is about to purchase a Hunter 350.

Royal Enfield J-Platform is the base design of their new 350cc engine that debuted in the Meteor 350. Note that J-platform engine is just the base engine and not the motorcycle itself. RE will soon use this engine to update other motorcycles in its lineup - Classic 350 and Bullet 350. Or come up with other models that use the same engine or a variant of the engine.

This is the major difference between the UCE engine (Left) and new J-platform engine design (Right):

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In 2009, RE combined the gearbox and crank case in a single unit, which were earlier 2 individual units. That’s correct - the gearbox was a separate unit and the engine itself was another unit. Both were connected by the clutch chain that transferred power at the crank to the gearbox and front sprocket. The unified design led to the name “Unit Construction Engine” or UCE. However, the valve train didn’t change much. Just that the UCE engine had hydraulic lifters for the pushrods to eliminate frequent manual adjustments. Look at the green arrows highlighting the pushrods. The pushrods are actuated by cam gears that run in the RHS section of the engine. When pushed up by the cam lobe, they press open the valve in the head. The alternating cycle of the inlet and exhaust valve drives the 4-cycle engine. The advantage - old school thump! Because the movement is not as strictly governed as in the latest engines with timing chains. Also the engine design is simpler carrying forward the old technology with modern refinements. However, the disadvantages outweigh the advantages - vibrations at high speeds, ineffective valve operation at high rpm, etc. All because of the distance between the cams and the valve tips.

Here’s where the cams reside. The two vertical cylinders on the top house the hydraulic lifters.

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The new J-platform is like a big-ass version of let’s say a 150cc Honda Unicorn engine. It uses similar technology. The valves are actuated by rocker arms pushed by overhead cam-shaft residing in the engine head itself. The camshaft is connected to the crank by a timing chain. The result - super-refined performance, better power delivery, better fuel economy, engine can run at higher rpm and hence higher top speed, less vibrations. Disadvantage - no slow-revving, lazy thump. But that’s a good thing considering the advantages the rider gets.

This design is used in most entry-level single-cylinder motorcycles. The Himalayan and Honda H’Ness CB 350 too use similar engine design. The rest of the features and ergonomics come from external design.

So, that’s what primarily distinguishes the J-platform from the former UCE platform.
 
I just sold my Classic 350 and got the 411 scrambler.
Loved the Classic looks, but its too heavy for the 19 hp it makes, plus its is a very noisy (rattles/knocks) motor.
The 411 motor makes about 25 hp which makes a big difference, plus the scrambler is lighter.

The scrambler can run at 70 mph comfortably and hit 80, the Classic was limited to 71 mph and could not always do it.
I do not see the 350 engine as being better in any respect over the 411. It makes more noise, less power, does not have another gear.
Valve checks are also a bit worse on the 350 where the entire valve cover has to come off with the gasket half glued on, while
the 411 motor has caps over each valve you can remove.
I am unsure why RE came out with the 350 motor, slightly better economy?
 
I just sold my Classic 350 and got the 411 scrambler.
Loved the Classic looks, but its too heavy for the 19 hp it makes, plus its is a very noisy (rattles/knocks) motor.
The 411 motor makes about 25 hp which makes a big difference, plus the scrambler is lighter.

The scrambler can run at 70 mph comfortably and hit 80, the Classic was limited to 71 mph and could not always do it.
I do not see the 350 engine as being better in any respect over the 411. It makes more noise, less power, does not have another gear.
Valve checks are also a bit worse on the 350 where the entire valve cover has to come off with the gasket half glued on, while
the 411 motor has caps over each valve you can remove.
I am unsure why RE came out with the 350 motor, slightly better economy?
Cool! Still rocking a tw?
 
Quite good, the limitation is the tires more then anything else.
In sand, the weight tells. Also on tight singletrack, tossing that weight around takes effort.
I have done about 300 miles of dirt riding on it in all situations and its quite good at a more relaxed pace, its no ktm race bike.
 
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