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Stoves, What is your poison??

FLrider

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Ft Lauderdale
For starters... While car/boat camping, I have a two burner Coleman that has been great. It's cheap, works well even though it uses gas like no tomorrow..
For the bike I have an MSR Dragonfly, an MSR Pocket Rocket and new in my stable is an MSR WindBurner.
I like the MSR gear, but realize there is other great stuff out there.. And no I don't take all 3 MSR stoves with me at the same time. :lol3 All depends on what I am doing..

:lurk
 
MSR original first year (73) multi-fuel. Val d Or, Ontario, Okeechobee FL, Lajitas, TX, fill in that triangle for 49 years. Cook another breakfast tomorrow.

Illustration follows. Mine will be in an estate sale…
 
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For 50P in 1971 i purchased a radius stove in a battered tin. Its been my main stove ever since, its been all over the UKNew zealand europe and north Africa and after 50 years its lost the tin lid which was bent / batered when i got it and it split and cut me one night so i slung it. other than that its been 100% i have not had my 50Ps worth out of it yet and im not looking for a replacement.

Zackly like this un. No 19 apparently.

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I have had a few different stoves for camping off the bike. My favorite is the cheap stoves off of Amazon.

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They pack up extremely small. Unlike the Jetboil, these stoves have a good flame adjustment, so they are better for cooking. The Jetboil is just good for boiling water. These stoves are very inexpensive.

Buy an inexpensive pot/pan kit from Amazon too and you are pretty well setup.
 
I have had a few different stoves for camping off the bike. My favorite is the cheap stoves off of Amazon.

2D08AA22-5E39-4790-95CC-C7E5B451CE60.jpeg



They pack up extremely small. Unlike the Jetboil, these stoves have a good flame adjustment, so they are better for cooking. The Jetboil is just good for boiling water. These stoves are very inexpensive.

Buy an inexpensive pot/pan kit from Amazon too and you are pretty well setup.
That's what I use on the bike. I've been very satisfied with it as well. Just make sure you're on a level surface.
 
That's the one I use in the deer blind. Mine eats gas like crazy, but it sure does the job.

We have these in all the deer blinds at the Ranch

Being in Texas, you run it on low for 15 min, then turn it off, and repeat till Bambi takes single tap to the temple or heart.

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I've always thought it threw off enough heat on HI, it could fry an egg in a pinch.
 
Looks ok, except I can't tell if it has anything covering the burner to protect it when it's used as a grill. There's a photo of the burner without a cover, so maybe not. If you get one, it wouldn't take you long to make up an insert. Otherwise, grilling will make a giant mess of the lower box and probably lead to a grease fire.

Thank you for pointing out grease management

I'll keep looking, there is also a 2 burner version that has a really nice grate (Which is an important feature to me). It comes with the SS "tents" over the burners

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Here's my other stove. I bought this one for car camping, but have used it a lot more at home when the power is out. It works great, and I've had it 20 years or so. The propane cylinder angle is a bit awkward, because it will tip over with no weight on the burner. A can of soup props it up perfectly, though. At camp, I usually find a rock the right size. This one put out a LOT of heat.

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I have been using an Esbit. It isn't fast or particularly efficient, but it is very small and light. It takes about 2-3 of those pellets to boil enough water for a 2 person dehydrated meal.


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That is the pinnacle of dead simple stoves, plus you dont have a bunch of empty propane/gas canisters to carry with or pack out. Brilliant .

I guess one could put two of these side by side and double the BTU's and use a 12" frying pan or griddle to make bacon and eggs for more than one person.
 
For car camping we have two options. A two burner propane Brunton similar to the ubiquitous Coleman two burner. The second I just picked up and am looking forward to using more is a Chargriller 17" Flat Iron Griddle. Yeah not technically a stove but for camp cooking I can't think of anything I would rather use than a griddle. Pair the griddle with a kettle and any of my lightweight stoves and we can make plenty of options and most importantly coffee.

On the lightweight side, a homemade alcohol stove, one of the cheap Amazon burners like Yinzer posted, and an MSR Whisperlite International. Situation dictates which of those I will take.
 
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Here's my other stove. I bought this one for car camping, but have used it a lot more at home when the power is out. It works great, and I've had it 20 years or so. The propane cylinder angle is a bit awkward, because it will tip over with no weight on the burner. A can of soup props it up perfectly, though. At camp, I usually find a rock the right size. This one put out a LOT of heat.

1648124862169.png

The one thing to remember is that those camp stoves can be very handy to have when your area has been hit by some natural disaster. After hurricanes go through, we always invariably lose power so my double burner Coleman has come in very handy at the house as well. I am not a 'prepper' per se but it is always good to be ahead of the curve and have certain things handy just in case.... YMMV
 
The one thing to remember is that those camp stoves can be very handy to have when your area has been hit by some natural disaster. After hurricanes go through, we always invariably lose power so my double burner Coleman has come in very handy at the house as well. I am not a 'prepper' per se but it is always good to be ahead of the curve and have certain things handy just in case.... YMMV
Exactly. We are in the high fire danger area of California, so PG&E has taken to turning off the power whenever the wind kicks up to prevent fires, plus the usual times when snow takes out a line in winter. Between this stove and my small generator, those events aren't that big of a deal.
 
Exactly. We are in the high fire danger area of California, so PG&E has taken to turning off the power whenever the wind kicks up to prevent fires, plus the usual times when snow takes out a line in winter. Between this stove and my small generator, those events aren't that big of a deal.
We dont lose power often in Texas, but we do grill out quite often. We open up our house to friends who are traveling, and enjoy to host and BBQ for our guests

This little 7 burner Gem is our back up stove at home for any Natural Disaster where we may lose the Natural Gas to the house stove.


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