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Triumph Doesn't Make the Bike I Want

cabanza

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So I want a T120 with the T100 5 speed gearbox and the suspension and wheels from the Street Scrambler and the exhaust from the Street Twin. Is that really too much to ask? I guess I could settle for a Scrambler 1200 with the Speed Twin exhaust and the handlebar from the Trident 660. See what I mean?
 

cabanza

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I wonder what the odds are of all the stuff you want simply bolting together are?

If you were inclined toward a project that is.
I think you can put the forks and front wheel and rear shocks of the Street Scrambler on a T100 without too many problems. The parts are probably pretty expensive though and it would turn an $11,000 bike into a $17,000-$18,000 bike.

Same with the Triumph Scrambler 1200. You start at $14,500(?) and quickly work your way to $17K or more.
 

psykown

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Wrecked bikes! Makes for a fun build trying to figure out how to make everything fit, it helps that ive gotten a few for free. Working on a Triumph Tiny Tiger atm, starting with a friends wrecked daytona chassis, some leftover DRZ400 forks, a very custom rear subframe, and a random cafe racer seat. All in I think I will only have about $500 into it. :ricky
 

cabanza

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After doing some comparisons (specs, parts, and high rez pictures), the Street Twin and the Street Scrambler are the closest. The Bonneville bikes T100 and T120 are different (exhaust and brakes for sure). An easy mash up would be adding the wheels, rear shocks, and forks from the Street Scrambler to the Street Twin. The frame of the Street Scrambler is different from the Street Twin in the rear where room has to be made to accommodate the high exhaust. The Street Twin exhaust has many parts and does not fit a T100/ T120. It doesn't look like the tanks from the Street Twin and the T100 are interchangeable either.
 

Captain Jim

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In the words of the philosopher Mick Jagger: you can't always get what you want. Well, most of the time you can, it just takes money. Given your buying history: pick one and buy it. You'll be ready for a different model in a few months. ;-) Meant as humor... it's funny 'cause it's true.
 

cabanza

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In the words of the philosopher Mick Jagger: you can't always get what you want. Well, most of the time you can, it just takes money. Given your buying history: pick one and buy it. You'll be ready for a different model in a few months. ;-) Meant as humor... it's funny 'cause it's true.
Lol! It is SO true!

Since last August, I have bought a GROM then and NC750X then a Trail 125 and a PCX for my wife. I already sold the GROM and the NC. I need a bike! :lol3
 

Amos Malone

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I think you can put the forks and front wheel and rear shocks of the Street Scrambler on a T100 without too many problems. The parts are probably pretty expensive though and it would turn an $11,000 bike into a $17,000-$18,000 bike.

Same with the Triumph Scrambler 1200. You start at $14,500(?) and quickly work your way to $17K or more.
You buy couple of new bikes, swap the parts you want from one to the other. Then keep the one with the parts you like and sell the other one as "improved" "unique" bike. Depending people's gullibility you might make a profit.
 

Alan F.

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Or buy a few bikes that were totaled for no good reason (minor damage only) and document what swaps over.

Build one for proof of concept with factory parts, then start a custom shop building them with new parts for customers at premium prices. These new parts might be cheaper purchased as assembled bikes.

Eventually the factory will offer your combo if it proves successful.
 

cabanza

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You buy couple of new bikes, swap the parts you want from one to the other. Then keep the one with the parts you like and sell the other one as "improved" "unique" bike. Depending people's gullibility you might make a profit.
Or lose money
 

cabanza

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I went to a dealer on Saturday. The Street Twin and the Street Scrambler are the same bike. The difference is in the suspension and part of the rear frame on the Street Scrambler to accommodate the passenger peg because of the high exhaust.

The Street Scrambler wheels are about $1,300 which is the price difference between the Street Scrambler and the Street Twin. Some people say to just swap the exhaust but the exhaust from the Street Twin is actually a lot more money. The forks are identical - the spring may be different though. The rear shocks are different (longer on the Scrambler) so that they help level the bike with the addition of the 19" wheel.

I am thinking about it.

I also found this special edition I didn't know about. I love the paint job.

6262e633517d145bf227b287.jpg
 

4PawsHacienda

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Nice special edition!

A recently departed bike was a 5 speed and I just never adjusted. Major reason I sold it.

If I was honestly considering changing out the suspension of a bike I'd be doing it for performance reasons primarily rather than looks.
 

cabanza

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Nice special edition!

A recently departed bike was a 5 speed and I just never adjusted. Major reason I sold it.

If I was honestly considering changing out the suspension of a bike I'd be doing it for performance reasons primarily rather than looks.
I learned on a 5 speed and I've always thought a 5 speed was nice because it is less shifting and you don't have to think as much about what gear you're in. I'm old school that way.

I'd swap the suspension (fork springs and rear shocks) with aftermarket parts. They usually are better than the OEM for just about the same (other than Ohlins).
 

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